About Kimbesa

I love dishes, and I continue to haunt thrift stores, estate sales, and other places where vintage china, dinnerware and glassware are to be found.

I talk about Dishes

Made in the USA

Found: Hartstone Pottery Dinnerware Accessory

Hartstone Pottery Cheyenne stoneware

I added a candle holder in the Cheyenne pattern by Hartstone to my collection this week. I was almost jumping when I saw it on the thrift store shelf.

Hartstone Pottery is heavy, durable stoneware, made in the USA. You never know what you will find on a day of thrift store shopping.

I was glad to be able to rescue this piece before they came through with the recycle barrel.

Hartstone markings are not always obvious to those who are not familiar with this dinnerware. I’ve bought their stoneware for many years now, and I’ve taken the factory tour. . . . → Read More: Found: Hartstone Pottery Dinnerware Accessory

Using Your Turkey Platter – Thanksgiving Dinner

Many turkey platters are so beautiful that they can hang on the wall when not being used to serve your Thanksgiving dinner.

Most standard, oval-shape china platters produced to match your dinnerware set are in the 12 to 16 inch range in length.

Turkey platters, as their name may lead you to conclude, are bigger. They start at 16 inches and go up to 20, or even 24 inches long. The large platter in the Plymouth pattern by Pfaltzgraff, for example, is 18 inches long by 14 inches wide.

A big platter to serve a big bird. Carving the turkey . . . → Read More: Using Your Turkey Platter – Thanksgiving Dinner

Blueberries and Berkeley – Vintage Noritake

Vintage Noritake Berkeley pattern

Finishing off the last of this year’s luscious blueberry crop from Michigan farms. It has been a great year for this fruit. And, an excuse to get out a gorgeous bowl for the feast.

The Berkeley pattern by Noritake was made from the mid-1950s to around 1960.

I’ve only found a few pieces of Berkeley (spelled like the city in California, not the town in Michigan), and I keep this for special use. Not the kind of dinnerware to put in the dishwasher, or otherwise clean with harsh soap.

This is one of those patterns that’s the dinnerware equivalent . . . → Read More: Blueberries and Berkeley – Vintage Noritake

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