About Kimbesa

I love dishes, and I continue to haunt thrift stores, estate sales, and other places where vintage china, dinnerware and glassware are to be found.

I talk about Dishes

Made in the USA

Vintage Dishes – Just Two – What To Do?

Pairs of vintage dinnerware pieces

I like to use my vintage china. One challenge: setting a table for a group, when I only have a few of the piece types I want to use to serve the foods I’ve cooked.

What can you do, when you have only two?

Secondary marketplaces are spotty in their detailed offerings. Yes, there’s lots of vintage dinnerware and glassware out there. No, the pattern you’re looking for can be tough to find.

If you have (or want) only two of a kind, there are ways you can use them:

Dinner for two. Set a romantic, charming table when . . . → Read More: Vintage Dishes – Just Two – What To Do?

Old Country Roses – vintage and classic Royal Albert china

Quiche dish – Old Country Roses

The popular Royal Albert china pattern Old Country Roses came up, on a conference call with some Internet colleagues.

It is a classic pattern, made since 1962 in numerous versions, that is still going strong today. Old Country Roses has a fluted and non-fluted version, the holiday version, the garden and damask versions. And that’s not all.

Part of what makes it classic is the charm of the rose motif. It brings to mind relaxing teas and holiday dinners. The best of the old mingled with enjoyment of the new. And it’s been . . . → Read More: Old Country Roses – vintage and classic Royal Albert china

Bake a cake in vintage Pyrex

Pyrex made these round baking dishes, for layer cakes and similar desserts, in the 1950s and 1960s. We eat more pie than cake at our house, but these dishes work quite well for upside down cakes, coffee cake and similar, single layer cakes that are handy for snacks and quick lunch accompaniments.

And they are deep enough to use for a deep-dish pie if you like. This baking dish would also be handy for roasting vegetables in pinch, if you’re only doing a small quantity and want to make best use of your oven space.

We’ve seen them in . . . → Read More: Bake a cake in vintage Pyrex

Saucy saucemaker by Corning Ware

Quite likely, everyone I know grew up with Corning Ware cookware and bakeware in the Cornflower Blue pattern.

Cornflower Blue

Cornflower Blue is so associated with the company that as soon as you see it, you think “Corning Ware.”

The sauce maker, though, is less common. These were sold in the 1960s and 1970s, with and without glass covers.

I’d use this for warming spaghetti sauce, or making Welsh Rarebit, which starts with a basic white sauce, then gets milk, cheese and tomato juice. The spouts on this pot would make it easy to pour the contents over . . . → Read More: Saucy saucemaker by Corning Ware

Hartstone Pottery – Sweet!

This quality pottery is handmade in Zanesville, Ohio, by “the original” Hartstone.

This company has roots back to the 1970s. It went through a period of corporate ownership, and was closed.

But in a town of 25,000, the loss of 400 jobs was painful, not to mention the loss of a piece of history. Southeastern Ohio has a long history of pottery making, and most of it is gone. Roseville, McCoy, Crooksville, Shawnee and Weller are just a few of the Ohio potteries that are familiar to collectors of vintage American pottery and dinnerware.

So . . . → Read More: Hartstone Pottery – Sweet!

Love casseroles!

We’d never heard of Merry Mushroom, though we must have walked by pieces in this pattern many, many times. This motif is the height of 1970s kitsch…

There are lots and lots of items made in this pattern, right down to the napkin holder, wall clock and dishes for corn on the cob. Many of the items were made for and sold by Sears.

This 4-quart casserole was made by Corning. Note the different style of the glass top, with the indents. The center knob is indented in the center, though the item is weighty nevertheless.

Reminds me of . . . → Read More: Love casseroles!

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