About Kimbesa

I love dishes, and I continue to haunt thrift stores, estate sales, and other places where vintage china, dinnerware and glassware are to be found.

I talk about Dishes

Made in the USA

Cinco de Mayo Meets Swedish Modern

Swedish Modern glass with salsa and chips

There are always new ways to celebrate, and mix the best of vintage dishes with current holidays. When I saw this pairing of two Swedish Modern vintage glass pieces, an idea dawned. Let me serve chips and salsa for Cinco de Mayo in this vintage glassware, design inspired by a colder part of the world.

Swedish Modern is a style that’s sleek and clean. It was very popular during the 1950s and 1960s, when this glassware was made. Like all things “modern” in style, this pattern has a classic appeal. It’s timeless and relaxed. It will hold its own in . . . → Read More: Cinco de Mayo Meets Swedish Modern

Gold Vintage Glassware | Bling for Thanksgiving Table Setting

Glasswre 3-part server Georgian

Shiny bright glass, and gold vintage glassware in particular, offers a special opportunity for your Thanksgiving and fall table settings.

Warmer than amber, bright gold glasses and other serving pieces can give extra spark to complement your china.

Finding Vintage Gold Glassware

Check the secondary marketplace. This is a color from the late 1960s to early 1970s, as you may remember if you’re in the right age bracket. Remember those Harvest Gold refrigerators and stoves? Cookware was also made in this color. Learn the patterns and choose the one(s) you like best. Some of the patterns: Georgian, Swedish Modern, Fairfield . . . → Read More: Gold Vintage Glassware | Bling for Thanksgiving Table Setting

Vintage Glass Retro Style | Soreno Green

Soreno green glass snack sets Vintage

Green glassware can mix and match with lots of different tableware patterns, both glass and china. Vintage glass in the Soreno Green pattern by Anchor Hocking was created in the late 1960s and has classic retro style that is still relevant to today’s table settings.

This pattern was made in multiple colors, in addition to the avocado or olive green. These include clear glass, clear iridescent, aquamarine and amber gold. These colors can mix with each other as well.

The line also included a number of piece types. Standard drinking glassware such as tumblers, juice and old fashioned . . . → Read More: Vintage Glass Retro Style | Soreno Green

Brown Vintage Glassware | Retro Style

Vintage Libbey glassware Impromptu and Accent in tawny brown

Out scouting today, I found some brown vintage glassware, the kind I especially look for. I love the sleek shapes of this glass, as do people who are looking to set a retro-style dinner table.

Brown is a great color for fall, and it trends in and out of fashion in general. Now it is on the “in” swing.

This color was also prominent in the 1970s, and the retro glassware in the photo is from that era.

A soft nut brown color, dark or light, is sometimes called “tawny.”

Note the similarity and differences in the shapes, as well . . . → Read More: Brown Vintage Glassware | Retro Style

Vintage Glassware | Fall Colors

vintage glassware in bold colors

When I’m scouting for vintage glassware, the retro green and golden amber colors stand out strong on the shelf.

They are distinctive and bold, and work well with contemporary table settings based on an autumn color palette, as well as those built around other vivid colors.

Some of the vintage glassware patterns that were made in these colors:

Eldorado was originally made by Hazel Atlas, before and after the acquisition by Continental Can in the 1950s. The tall tumblers in the photo are in gold. Eldorado was also made in an olive green. They have raised dots on the inside. . . . → Read More: Vintage Glassware | Fall Colors

Why Use Vintage Dinnerware

Oreo cookies served on vintage glass nappy

I’ve been looking at lots of vintage dinnerware lately, most in connection with vintage weddings. Then a new cookie came on the market, and the contrast between old and new struck me.

Why do people in modern times, this 21st century, want to use vintage dishes, glassware and other tableware? Why create a new twist, based on something old?

It seems obvious when you think about the Oreo cookie, nearly 100 years old. They create the newest riff based on a proven winner and produce the Triple Double.

Yet when it comes to dinnerware and glass, what’s up with . . . → Read More: Why Use Vintage Dinnerware

Indiana Glass | Style Old and New

vintage Indiana glass

Indiana Glass was made for so long that the available styles cover a number of timeless design trends.

While much of the glass produced by Indiana is now vintage, the styles are still relevant, making this glassware a good candidate for today’s table settings.

This beautiful glassware can fit into many table setting themes and color schemes, as styles come and go over time.

Just look at the modern and traditional contrast of only two patterns made during the 100-year life of this company.

The large piece is a salad serving bowl in the Luau pattern. This item is . . . → Read More: Indiana Glass | Style Old and New

Indiana Glass | Loganberry

Loganberry bowl Indiana Glass

Indiana Glass made a number of patterns that I’m especially fond of in glassware. These pieces are based on nature, with motifs that include leaves, fruit, berries and flowers.

When I look for vintage glassware from the 1970s, color is one of my guidelines. Colors like golden amber and olive green are a telltale sign.

Remember the metal cookware and kitchen appliances like stoves and refrigerators, which came in Harvest Gold and Avocado Green?

The Loganberry pattern is on my list. It fits into the colors and motifs I look for.

The leaves and berry motif is molded . . . → Read More: Indiana Glass | Loganberry

Glassware Shapes | Table Setting Charm

Sample shapes clear vintage glassware

Clear glassware goes with many table settings, kinda like white dinnerware. The shapes and motifs also come into play, as does the quality of the glass. Some patterns are elegant, some are casual, and you’ll want to harmonize your glassware choices with your overall theme.

In addition, the beverage menu comes into play.

Goblets in various sizes are designed for water, iced tea or other cool drinks. These are footed, and may or may not have a stem.

Tumblers are “flat” which means the bottom is flat. These come in capacity sizes from a few ounces, up to . . . → Read More: Glassware Shapes | Table Setting Charm

Glassware | Lots to Love

When I’m scouting, choosing between the glassware and the dinnerware can be a tough choice!

Both have so many charms to tempt me, though I often find the china dishes to be easier to work with.

Glass has its challenges, in both identification and condition. I presume that glassware in the secondary marketplace has some kind of condition defect, unless my close inspection proves otherwise. It’s easy for a chip or crack to go unnoticed, especially when the surface is textured.

Even so, glass is often worth the challenge.

Why I love glassware

Shiny glass is charming; nothing shines like . . . → Read More: Glassware | Lots to Love

Tapioca Pudding in Glassware

All dressed up and someplace to go…

…your dining table for your guests’ enjoyment!

Plain vanilla tapioca pudding doesn’t have to go Plain Jane to serve your guests.

With a bit of real whipped cream, some silver cookie decorations and a silver plated spoon, it can be dressed up and ready to be elegant and tasty.

The goblet by Bormioli in the Bahia pattern. The silver plated teaspoon is by International in the Triumph pattern (circa 1941 version). And the dinner plate is in the Federalist White pattern by Sears.

Silver cookie dragees are as close as your nearest grocery . . . → Read More: Tapioca Pudding in Glassware

Blog Widget by LinkWithin