About Kimbesa

I love dishes, and I continue to haunt thrift stores, estate sales, and other places where vintage china, dinnerware and glassware are to be found.

I talk about Dishes

Made in the USA

Happy 7th Birthday – Diary of a Dishie

Diary of a Dishie birthday glassware

Time to wish my vintage china blog another happy birthday!

For year No. 7, I decided to go with some vintage clear glass, a theme that’s a little more Big Girl than some of the prior, younger years. Just like you might have something new when your daughter reaches the seventh birthday milestone.

I’ve got a soft spot for glassware, especially the beautiful vintage pieces you can find in any thrift store or estate sale.

Glass is tough, because so much of it is not marked. I cannot tell you (yet) the names of the patterns for the pieces . . . → Read More: Happy 7th Birthday – Diary of a Dishie

Vintage Dinnerware Look Alikes

Noritake china mark

A question from a reader, Beck, prompts this post. Do you ever see dishes in the marketplace that look a lot like your favorite pattern?

And, when you flip, you see a frilly scroll mark with “made in China” under it.

Probably not the match to grandma’s china.

I’ve seen this kind of mark on dishes a number of times in my travels. I’ve never bought them, though they look perfectly fine.

When I want my favorite patterns and brands, I know the marks to look for.

Beck’s grandma’s china reminded me of a Noritake pattern that I’ve seen, . . . → Read More: Vintage Dinnerware Look Alikes

Vintage China in Pastels – Bring Spring

vintage china Franciscan 1960s

I just cannot resist those trays of Danish sweet rolls at Costco. And what better way to serve them in sweet, small bites than some vintage dessert plates?

In this case, the plates are in the Maytime pattern by Franciscan.

This is an uncommon pattern, from the 1960s, during the period when Gladding McBean produced Franciscan in the USA. Retro style and pretty colors. What’s not to like?

Why Pastels?

Just some of the reasons I can think of, why pastels remain popular: Light color palette has an open, springy feel Sweet colors complement and soften details of other . . . → Read More: Vintage China in Pastels – Bring Spring

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